1EYE, ROAMING: Introducing BOOKS II & III

1EYE, ROAMING was never meant to become a series. Released in 2013, the book was a return to the very first images I had shot with a Fujifilm X-series camera—the original X100—during a trip through France. It represented a sea change and a new, simpler way of seeing for me: one camera, one lens...one focal length.

But it also became a method of traveling and shooting from which I’ve never wavered. So when I began to imagine a framework for new books, it eventually dawned on me that I had one already: 1EYE, ROAMING had set the stage. Different cities, different eye—same concept and approach.

Today I’m introducing Books II and III: Venice & Rome and In Tokyo. Both have been in the works for quite some time, enough that I could’ve staggered their release. But at this point—despite the geographic distances—they felt complementary to me.

With Book II we find ourselves in Italy during the fall of 2014, exploring the streets of two famous cities with an X100S. In Book III we’re in Japan, during my six-day visit to Tokyo in January 2016—this time with an X-Pro2 and the XF 35mm f/2 lens, switching from a 35mm to a 50mm POV.

The tone of these new chapters is slightly different, less verbose, less of a diary than Book I. But they follow in the footsteps of the original by also including brief “technical” addendums—a look at processing and an essay in Book II; annotated contact sheets in Book III.

Both eBooks can be purchased individually but I’ve also created a double-pack—which adds a bit of a discount. You can learn more about the new books in the Publications section. It feels good to finally release these...like turning a page. I do hope you’ll find something worthwhile, should you decide to add them to your collection.

No holiday wishes yet...I should be back one last time before the week is over :)


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Making the Cover

A change of tone and a bit of an uplift today: the June issue of Photo Life is out and one of my pictures made the cover. I'm super thrilled about it. I've been working with the magazine for a few months now and they're just a great bunch of people to collaborate with. I'm even mentioned in the editorial...now that's just icing on the cake.

Obviously—as iPad bound as I am— I had to get my hands on an honest to goodness non electron-based copy this time around. It's just cheaper to frame ;)

Hidden away: Lightroom's Loupe Overlay used to visualize various cover possibilities. 

When they told me about this possibility, Guy Langevin—the magazine's editor—sent me a template to play around with and help with image selection. I used Lightroom's little known (and slightly hidden) Loupe Overlay feature to load the PNG file and visualize various possibilities, which I then sent in for review. Fun process really.

My article this month is entitled The Fleeting Masterpiece - A Traveller's Guide to Street Photography and the issue—packed full of great articles and imagery—just hit newsstands. Gotta say it's quite an honour to be included alongside such a stellar body of work.

If you're interested, the magazine is also available through the Photo Life app or their official website.

Introducing The Curated Archives

The flip side to writing a blog for any decent amount of time is that, at some point, content gets buried. Sure, there’s a search page and a tag cloud and categories to dig through but in the end —especially for a photo oriented site— all of it tends to lack visual appeal: you’re looking at a bunch of titles or scrolling a long list of posts, chronologically. Time pushes everything down, regardless of value. The other issue is formatting: over the years I switched from Wordpress to Squarespace; then new templates with bigger images, a different signature. It adds up to a disjointed look as you move back into the archived work.

So for a while now I’d been trying to find a solution, a way of unifying past and present. Not to wallow in old stories but just to level the playing field and bring buried content forward, a window into more than simply the newest of the new. Allow things to remain visible. The result is now available and can be found under the Blog heading: I call it The Curated Archives. Think of it as another way of browsing the site.

The main page of The Curated Archives contains two grids giving access to a selection of reviews (going back to the original X100) but also to stories and essays shot with every X-Series camera I’ve used over the years — a maximum of 30 posts per model. Using cameras as the differentiating factor allowed me to keeps things manageable while including material that went all the way back to 2011, which is when the site format really started to take shape (yup, when I got my hands on that X100).

I’m not just linking to existing posts: all images have been re-uploaded at the current resolution, larger and formatted just like they’d been shot yesterday. In some cases I re-processed the work in Lightroom but I did it as an exercise, staying true to the originals.

The selection is pretty extensive but I have, however, omitted two things:
1) Tutorials.
2) The Lutetia series.
Why? Well, in the case of the tutorials I feel they’re showing their age. A lot of these centre around Aperture and while most concepts are transferable to other software, they now seem woefully outdated. I constantly receive emails about this topic and have plans regarding processing articles, but I’m still brainstorming on the shape these will take. As for the Lutetia series: I just think 1EYE, ROAMING does a much better job of it; I spent a lot of time on that material and the original posts now feel like drafts—interesting but not worth revisiting all over again. Of course all of the above content is still available the same way it’s always been; those posts simply don’t appear as part of the selection.

It’s always interesting to go back and look at where we were before. It provides orientation, a sense of the path we’re on. In preparing these archives, I was surprised at times by things I’d forgotten, by certain experiments that could still prove useful in the future. I also couldn’t help but see how our kids have grown up through all of this… The biographical aspect of it is hard to deny.

I’ve set the archives up in a way that will allow me to easily manage content and I must say it feels pretty good:  like I now have an anchor, something to hold it all together instead of pushing stuff away as time passes and life moves on. I’m hoping you’ll see the value in this as well.

I leave you with a few weekend images, all shot with the X-T1 and XF 56mm f/1.2… Gotta let that X100T breathe a little ;)
Later

This European Diary | Rome #1


Shot with the X100S


This European Diary | Venezia-Roma


Shot with the X100S